hyperallergic:

(via Early High-Speed Photographs Offer Incredible Details of Motion)
Back in the 1930s, an electrical engineer from Nebraska, working at MIT, developed the first “strobe” flash for photography, changing the way motion is documented. Dr. Harold Edgerton took thousands of high-speed photographs during his career, and some from his estate are on public display for the first time at Michael Hoppen Gallery in London.
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lensblr-network:

Escalator | pinhole camera
by Bruce Couch  (bodiegroup.tumblr.com)

tokyodailyphoto:

Genius.

How else do you get goods all the way down into the Metro? Tank wheels…of course!

Switcheroo: Genki & Kuki

sincerelyhana:

image

imageTokyo, Japan - August 2013 
sincerelyhana.com

artruby:

Doug Aitken, Altered Earth (2012).

My Dad near Banff National Park (c.1860) - HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!
Francis Galton’s composite portraits
Francis Galton in 1879 (http://www.galton.org/essays/1870-1879/galton-1879-jaigi-composite-portraits.pdf)

"Already they have uprooted the prejudice that commanded the painter to remain motionless in front of the object, at a fixed distance from it, and to catch on the canvas no more than a retinal photograph more or less modified by “personal feeling.” They have allowed themselves to move round the object, in order to give, under the control of intelligence, a concrete representation of it, made up of several successive aspects. Formerly a picture took possession of space, now it reigns also in time."

- Jean Metzinger (1911)

hyperallergic:

(via Drugs, Guns, Photographs: Taking Shots with William S. Burroughs)
Writer William S. Burroughs took thousands of photographs from the 1950s to 1970s, but it’s likely you’ve not seen many as even he didn’t treat them like an art, but a mode of disrupting time. “Take — Rearrange — Take,” was his photographic objective written down in 1963.
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